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Crazy Domains. Name.com. GoDaddy. And every webhost seem to want to sell you more domains names on top of the one you’ve already got. Do you need a domain in every country to protect yourself? Or will just the one you’ve got be enough?

You’ve got your .com.au domain name. Maybe you were lucky enough to get the .com as well. So you’re sorted. Now you’re getting emails from strange places offering to sell you the .cn domain along with emails from your domain provider asking if you’d like the .tv, the .fm or .store version of your internet address. What should you do?

If you have a very generic name for your business that contains real world English words, rather than a name like Google or Kodak or TikTok, then maybe it’s worth your while making sure you go on a land grab for the .net.au or the .net. If you’re operating in more than one country and already have the .com, then there could be some value in getting hold of the .in for Indian or .id for Indonesia. Perhaps even the .co.nz and the .nz variations.

But if you have a very unique domain name, something that you are the only one of in the world, it may be a good idea to grab as many variations of your domain name that you can. Especially those variations that exist in countries that are known to harbour entities that tend towards cybercrime. So grabbing .ru or .uk version could be smart.

And then there are the strange variations of your domain name. if you have a domain name with “m” in it, it makes cyber security sense to buy a version of your domain that replaces the “m” with an “r” and an “n” next to it. This is because the bad guys have some clever ways of spoofing your web address by jamming the r and n next to each other to make it look like an “m.” So if your domain is something like “glamourpuss.com” then it might pay to prevent fraud with your customers by grabbing “glarnourpuss.com.”

Some people think that there is some natural advantage to having the .com or the .com.au over other variations of your domain name. This is usually only true because the holder of the .com or the .com.au has probably been around longer than you, or has been able to build years of momentum before you came along with the same name, but a different set of letters after the dot. But if you are the one with the .com.au or the .com, then you have the natural advantage of being around for longer and having the momentum, the headstart on blog posts and content and credibility. So should you buy that .cn, .tv or .io version of your name? Sure, why not? But don’t go too far and buy every variation unless you are planning to be (or are) an international company or a renowned brand.

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